A weekend in the Bay Islands, Honduras

Central America, Honduras

Roatán is the largest and most developed of the Bay Islands off the coast of Honduras. Long and thin (50km long, but only 2km to 4km wide), the island is a real diving and snorkelling hub – almost all of its coastline is surrounded by a diverse coral reef teeming with tropical fish. Set 65km off the Caribbean coast of Honduras, Roatán sits a golden jewel. Sandy beaches, cheap food and drink, and a surprisingly great vibe for an island whose mainland is currently experiencing the worst political unrest it has faced in years.

Roatán attracts a far more midrange crowd than its neighbouring island, Utila, with far more budget options for sleeping and eating. The main hub for backpackers is in West End, which is where we decided to stay.

The Caribbean!

West End

Getting there

On arrival at Juan Manuel Gálvez International Airport in Coxen Hole (the ‘capital’ of Roatán), we haggled with taxi drivers to get to West End. We tried to share with a few other tourists that had been on our flight, but as the drivers here price per person rather than per journey, we weren’t really able to get it any cheaper. We had read in the Lonely Planet that a colectivo runs from the highway just outside the airport. We tried to strategy but could not find any kind of bus stop, or see any minibuses running. As we were about to give up, a taxi arrived dropping somebody off, and agreed to take us to the West End to US$10 (£7) for the entire journey, instead of the US$30 they wanted inside the airport compound. Maybe we were getting an unlicensed taxi, but it saved us money and was quick and easy!

A point to remember if you visit the island; there are only a few ATMs on the island, and most of the time these don’t work! The most reliable ATM is at the airport in the terminal building. There is one in the West End, but it tends to be emptied fairly quickly in an attempt to curb crime. Make sure you have enough cash for your entire time on the island – not all restaurants and bars accept card! We had a bit of a nightmare trying to get cash out on our way to the 7am ferry off of the island when we realised we wouldn’t have enough cash to pay our taxi driver!

West End

Eating in the West End

There are a couple of really good haunts in the West End that the regulars will always swear by. Luckily, a lot of the finest eateries are based in the West End as there is so much more passing trade.

  1. Creoles Rotisserie Chicken is described in the Lonely Planet as an “island institution.” It is exactly that. Umming and ahhing at the entrance, a local passed us and told us it was the best on the island. It offers excellent Honduran-style roast chicken (we had the half chicken and a number of sides including rice, carrot salad, and coleslaw). Let me say this; the chicken here was better than any creole chicken we’ve had, even in New Orleans!
  2. Cannibal Café was the next choice for us. Seriously large tacos are a specialty with traditional Central American food in this relaxed eatery. We got stuck in a massive rain storm having finished our food, so kicked back with a few more Salva Vida’s (Honduran beers). Matt had a huge chimichanga, and I had sizzling chicken fajitas. This place also offers wine at an affordable price, which was a rare treat on Roatán!

Activities whilst on Roatán

Half Moon Bay, which forms the northern part of the West End, is a lovely sandy beach, with sheltered water. The few days we were on the island wasn’t the best weather, and because of this we only really had a little time on the beach, but I think this would be the best bet if it were complete beach weather.

Half Moon Bay, West End, Roatán

Diving and snorkelling are obviously top of the list when it comes to activities other than lounging by the sea. There are a number of different companies based in the West End. We went with Eco Divers as they were offering a discount through our hotel. We paid US$15 each for an hour trip, and we basically had free reign of exploring. We were the only people snorkelling on the particular trip, and so we were joined by a few others doing scuba diving (one of whom was doing their first deep sea dive!) and once we were dropped off, we were allowed to swim freely for 40 minutes. We had a great vibe from the instructors, and a successful first snorkel! They even let us borrow the equipment for a couple of hours before to have a little swim around in the bay to get used to it, as it had been so long since either of us had done it. Check out a video here!

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Being on Roatán for the weekend felt entirely different to what I thought it would. The island felt a lot more American than Central American, and it was easy to forget it’s Spanish roots being out on an island in the easy Caribbean. Honduras is currently experiencing a very bad political scene, but out in the Caribbean life is easier and there are no worries. We just hoped that the next few days travelling across mainland Honduras would be just as easy…

Ometepe to Granada 🇳🇮

Central America, Nicaragua

We booked the same taxi driver that collected us from Moyagulpa port on our arrival on the island to take us back for the boat the next day. He charged us slightly more than the first time as we were two people instead of four people sharing, but we bartered down to US$30 for the whole journey. This was still cheaper than a newly flagged taxi would have been.

Try to keep a card from a taxi driver if you intend on staying somewhere for a while and will need to take more cabs. Although you may think that the drivers are just touting for business, once they have delivered you safely, sometimes their repeat services are a godsend when you cannot find an alternative.

We arrived at the ferry port at 10:50am expecting to get the 11:30am ferry, but after paying 50NIO (£1.15/$1.60) each (15NIO more expensive than the boat that we took on the way), the ferry left at around 11:10am. I assume our early departure was because the ferry was full.

This ferry was a lot bigger, and if you are prone to seasickness, I would certainly recommend the ferry over the boat – it is a much smoother ride!

When we arrived after 70 minutes, we were planning to get to Rivas bus station and find the local bus to Granada (which departs every 90 minutes or so, taking around 2 hours). However, we tried out some poor Spanish to barter with a taxi driver who was offering to take us straight to Granada. We settled on this route for US$30. Up until this point, we’d been relying on local transport to take us on our journeys wherever we could, but on this occasion we were keen to get to Granada and explore the city having been enjoying the quiet lift on the Isla de Ometepe, so deemed US$30 was worth the extra speed and efficiency!

Crossing from Costa Rica into Nicaragua 🇳🇮

Central America, Costa Rica, Nicaragua

Having spent five wonderful (but expensive) nights in Costa Rica, we were ready to cross into our next country. Having read a lot of horror stories about the Nicaraguan border, we were nervous but excited for the trip.

We had pre-booked a shuttle through CaribeShuttle.com to pick us up at our hostel in Santa Elena, Monteverde at 6am and take us to Liberia. This shuttle runs only once a day, and at US$35 per person, was the most expensive form of transport for us (bar other flights) but it was by far the best way to travel in this instance.

It was just us and another couple on the shuttle to Liberia, so it was nice and quiet, but the road to the highway was pretty rough. It went from perfectly smooth tarmac to bumpy stones every thousand metres or so, which really didn’t make for a smooth ride! After about an hour along this road (with some pretty stunning views if you aren’t fast asleep – see above) and half an hour on the highway, we arrived at the Santa Rosa Plaza, where the bus was terminating (likely following a short coffee stop just outside of Liberia). I thought it might be more of a bus station, but was literally a car park for a shopping centre!

Don’t fall for the taxi and shuttle drivers offering to take you from Liberia to Peñas Blancas or beyond. It is a five minute walk from the shuttle Park to the bus station and buses leave regularly (and transport beyond the border is easy and cheap too!)

As we reached the bus station, we saw a Peñas Blancas (the border) bus sitting ready to leave. We were able to get our luggage on and paid around US$4 each for us and the luggage (and receiving some change in colónes) before two other travellers joined, and the bus left!


The fun really begun at the border. We had heard so many nightmare stories about how people were queueing for up to five hours around Christmas, and we were worried the same would happen today on New Year’s Eve. An international bus had arrived moments before we arrived, so we were keen to be speedy and miss these passengers!

The first thing to do at the border is to pay your exit tax. When you arrive, there will be people calling for this and leading you to a shady looking building about 500 yards away. There we paid our exit taxes (around US$8 each). The next thing to do is to go to the border office. This is found to the right of the border, and there you get your passports stamped for exit. We then started walking through the border, which is a long, unpaved road between the two countries. We passed border security who made sure we had paid and had our passports stamped. Arriving at the Nicaraguan side, we then had to pay US$1 each at the door (we had used all of our small notes for the bus) and around ~US$12 each entrance fee (you can pay in US dollars if you don’t already have Nicaraguan Córdoba – “NIO”) at the desk where our passports were stamped for entry. We did this whole process in the wrong order at first, so it took a lot longer to retrace our footsteps than it should have!


Top Tips:

  • Make sure you have lots of small US dollar notes for border taxes and exit/entrance
  • Take public transport where you can – it’s quick and cheap – the only place we couldn’t find it available was getting out of Monteverde to the nearest city, Liberia
  • Pay your exit tax as soon as you get to Peñas Blancas, and then start your walk through the border – ask somebody if you are unsure

We changed US$25 into NIO with somebody sat outside the office who had an official badge (we bartered to get a better rate!) and then as we were walking away, saw a chicken bus heading to Rivas about to leave. We jumped onto the bus and clutching our bags in the overhead shelf, we stood for the 45 minute journey to Rivas. This cost us 20NIO each.

Unsure where we were getting off, I kept an eye on the map, aware we had to get to San Jorge ferry terminal to catch our boat to Ometepe. The bus guard also knew this and shouted us off and helped us down with our bags.

Two different type of boats service the island; a boat costing 35NIO and a bigger ferry costing 50NIO. If you are prone to seasickness, the ferry is a much smoother ride. Ferries run less frequently though. The Ometepe website also advises that only the ferries run on a Sunday – this wasn’t the case for us, but that may have been because it was holiday season – we weren’t quite sure!

It was 11:40am and a 15 minute drive away, meaning the midday ferry we hoped to be on would be tight. We haggled with a taxi driver (difficult when he knows the ferry was leaving in 20 minutes) and he drove us to the ferry terminal for US$10 (we should have been able to get this for about US$5). We arrived with time to spare, but one of the ticket windows informed us it was too late. Somebody from another window came and told us the next smaller boat (not the ferry) was at 12:30pm and we could buy tickets from him. We bought our tickets for 35NIO, along with another couple who were also travelling to the island for ‘Año Nuevo’, and managed to get a taxi sorted for the journey on to our hotels from the arriving port for US$10 per person.

The boat was choppy, and took around 75 minutes, but we were rewarded with excellent views of the Isla Ometepe, and the two volcanos. Our pre-booked taxi driver was waiting for us on the other side, and we spent around 45 minutes driving around the island before our drop off at our ecolodge Totoco at around 2:30pm. The alternative would be to take Ometepe’s public bus. This wasn’t running over the holidays, but would be cheaper (and slower of course!)

The island of Ometepe is composed of two volcanoes, Concepción, which is still active, and the extinct Maderas. The small island has one main road which rings around the north volcano, Concepción, another road which rings around the southern volcano, Maderas, and a third road which links the two. The majority of the boat services run to Moyogalpa, which is on the north west of the island. There are some services that run to San José del Sur, which is to the south of the northern volcano. If you are staying south of the island, the San José ferry would save you some time once you are there, but the journey from Moyogalpa isn’t too long anyway!

Overall, a perfectly reasonable journey for what we thought could end up being a bit of a nightmare. We checked in for two evenings and brought in the new year! Read what we got up to in the next post!